sculpture/objects

sculpture/objects

Nature Morte (neglected fridge) 2017 Oil and acrylic paint over jelutong wood and mdf 44.5 x 40 x 36.5 cms This sculpture was made with an admiring nod to the still-life paintings of Juan Sánchez Cotán, particularly Still life with Thistle from around 1602.
Nature Morte (neglected fridge) 2017 Oil and acrylic paint over jelutong wood and mdf 44.5 x 40 x 36.5 cms
Every one has overlooked the contents of their fridge at some point. This sculpture was made with an admiring nod to the still-life paintings of Juan Sánchez Cotán, particularly Still life with Thistle from around 1602.
Broken Heart 2016 Oak with bamboo and acrylic on stainless steel plate A half devoured strawberry, the size of a human heart, is displayed on a platter like an abandoned meal.
Broken Heart 2016 Oak with bamboo and acrylic on stainless steel plate. Photo: © Andrew Jarvis 2016
A half devoured strawberry, the size of a human heart, is displayed on a platter like an abandoned meal.
Ladder 2014-16 Jelutong wood with acrylic, oils and gold leaf A carved and decorated ladder appears to ascend from the chaos of nature toward order. The rungs represent states of consciousness that may or may not be achieved throughout life - from sensory perception toward imagination, reason, deep insight, apprehension, comprehension and finally annihilation.
Ladder 2014-16 Jelutong wood with acrylic, oils and gold leaf

ladder-detail-1
A carved and decorated ladder appears to ascend from the chaos of nature toward order. The rungs represent states of consciousness that may or may not be achieved throughout life – from sensory perception toward imagination, reason, deep insight, apprehension, comprehension and finally annihilation.
Spoon 2016 Wooden spoon, acrylic paint and gold leaf The bowl of a wooden spoon has been pierced to describe a map of the world rendering it useless. Our high streets are full of discount shops selling tat that becomes land-fill in next to no time – resources are being chewed up and spat out. We are consuming the Earth.
Spoon 2016 Wooden spoon, acrylic paint and gold leaf
The bowl of a wooden spoon has been pierced to describe a map of the world rendering it useless.
Our high streets are full of discount shops selling tat that becomes land-fill in next to no time – resources are being chewed up and spat out.
We are consuming the Earth.
Fragment (Newark Place) 2014 42 x 29.7 cm Wood, sand, acrylic paint on plywood.
On most days I walk down a road alongside a 100 metre long wall that’s an ad hoc, makeshift thing. It’s held together by wonky repairs, ivy and tangled briars, and I love it. This is a tiny part of the wall.
Sapling (Evie) 2012 Oil paint over oak with applied timbers and acrylic paint I was given a small block of oak from a three hundred year old tree that had been recently felled. Oak is a sacred tree and it seemed appropriate to use it for a portrait of my new born daughter.
Sapling (Evie) 2012 Oil paint over oak with applied timbers and acrylic paint
I was given a small block of oak from a three hundred year old tree that had been recently felled. Oak is a sacred tree and it seemed appropriate to use it for a portrait of my new born daughter.
Durer's Turf 2010 Wood and acrylic paint. 41 x 76.5 x 60.5 cms. This work is an attempt to transcribe Albrecht Durer's 1503 watercolour The Great Turf into three dimensions. The small plot of tangled grasses and leaves that Durer depicted probably grew somewhere near his home in Nuremburg, but it’s also fairly typical of any Northern European grassland since pre-history. The making of the sculpture became an exercise about looking. What have we seen? And what do we think that we have seen? It became apparent that despite the apparent realism of Durer’s watercolour he must have edited a vast amount of information to make a coherent image. Grass doesn’t actually grow like this at all. We just believe that it does, and in the case of an artwork that is all that matters.
Durer’s Turf  2010 Wood and acrylic paint. 41 x 76.5 x 60.5 cms.
This work is an attempt to transcribe Albrecht Durer’s 1503 watercolour The Great Turf into three dimensions. The small plot of tangled grasses and leaves that Durer depicted probably grew somewhere near his home in Nuremburg, but it’s also fairly typical of any Northern European grassland since pre-history.
Broken Pillar 2010 Lint.
Tumble dryer lint was collected for five years and then assembled into a pillar.
The different layers are like the strata of some sedimentary rock laid down across time.
Water Buffalo (Yama’s Steed) 2009 Pierced skull with gold leaf This work was made in response to beauty and tradition of the Indian miniature for an exhibition at Hastings museum. It is a tribute to the water buffalo, the beast of burden that is at the very heart of Indian agriculture and central to its dairy industry. In the Western imagination it is often overlooked due to its sacred cousin that can be seen walking in the city streets In Hindu lore, Yama, the lord of death rides a water buffalo when out collecting souls.
Water Buffalo (Yama’s Steed) 2009 Pierced skull with gold leaf. Photo: © Andrew Jarvis 2009
This work was made in response to beauty and tradition of the Indian miniature for an exhibition at Hastings museum. It is a tribute to the water buffalo, the beast of burden that is at the very heart of Indian agriculture and central to its dairy industry. In the Western imagination it is often overlooked due to its sacred cousin that can be seen walking in the city streets.

In Hindu lore, Yama, the lord of death rides a water buffalo when out collecting souls.

Nef for Pygmy Shrew 2009 8 cm high. Shrew, starling skeleton, resin, wood, sealing wax, gold leaf, wood
A nef is a model boat that was used in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to decorate dining tables and carry condiments and hand towels for guests. Their form was also used for reliquaries.

This boat carries a deceased shrew. It was inspired by the Nef for Joanna the Mad in Toledo Cathedral.

Coffin Tree 2008 9 x 5 cm. Low melt alloy with gold leaf. Edition of 7
Doppelganger Urns 2006 Glazed slipware Whilst walking along a road I was suddenly confronted by a figure turning from a side street. We stared at each other in surprised silence as each realized that we were the other’s double. In many cultures, to encounter one’s doppelganger is regarded as a sign of imminent death. These urns record the fateful meeting. Slip cast in a two-part mould, they take my profile for their form. They may be useful in the near future.
Doppelganger Urns 2006 Glazed slipware
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Whilst walking along a road I was suddenly confronted by a figure turning from a side street. We stared at each other in surprised silence as each realized that we were the other’s double. In many cultures, to encounter one’s doppelganger is regarded as a sign of imminent death. These urns record the fateful meeting. Slip cast in a two-part mould, they take my profile for their form. They may be useful in the near future.
Humpty’s World 2005 Ostrich egg, acrylic. An antique ostrich egg was accidentally broken. The pieces were retrieved from the bin, numbered, coloured and reassembled. Like territories on a globe.
Humpty’s World 2005 Ostrich egg, acrylic.
An antique ostrich egg was accidentally broken. The pieces were retrieved from the bin, numbered, coloured and reassembled. Like territories on a globe.
Family Tree 2004 Engraved antler.
I found an antler and noticed that its branches mirrored exactly those of the Homonid family tree. Given that antler was always an important material for early man I decided to use it to explain our ancestory
Back to Nature (Poynings Sheep) 2003-4 Found sheep bones This animal met its fate in the Sussex countryside. The bones have been engraved to exaggerate their reclamation by the earth and serve as a memorial to the beast.
Back to Nature (Poynings Sheep) 2003-4 Found sheep bones
This animal met its fate in the Sussex countryside.
The bones have been engraved to exaggerate their reclamation by the earth and serve as a memorial to the beast.
Back to Nature 2001 Pierced sheep’s skull
Back to Nature 2002 Found skull. Approx. 10 x 13 x 21 cm
It didn’t seem right that the ram skull I found on Bodmin Moor when aged seven, and loved throughout my childhood, had been relegated to a box in the attic. Why not just return it to the land from where it came?

Whilst renewing my acquaintance with the treasure, two trees gradually emerged upon its surface, as if to reveal that everything is reclaimed by nature in the end.